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Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee

Valid Prescription Forms

In the new NHS, the Pricing Authority (NHS BSA), when it prices prescriptions, must be able to identify the cost centre in order to recharge the costs to the appropriate area. Therefore, from 1st April 2013, there is a new requirement to ensure prescriptions contain a prescriber code.

PSNC has created a guidance document on this which can be viewed here.

NHS Prescription Services have also issued some FAQ answers which may prove useful.


The following prescription forms can be dispensed by NHS pharmacy contractors in England & Wales:

(it may also be useful to look at the FAQ section below)

Forms Originating in England

Prescription Form IdentifierColourNotes

FP10
FP10NC
FP10HNC
FP10SS

Green

These FP10 Prescriptions may be issued by GPs or nurse and pharmacist prescribers, hospital doctors, supplementary prescribers or out of hours centres if correctly annotated. Forms annotated with the initials RD are repeat dispensing forms. Forms annotated with the initials RA are repeat authorisation forms.

FP10MDA
FP10MDA-S
FP10HMDA-S
FP10MDA-SS
FP10MDA-SP

Blue

Instalment dispensing prescription form. More information is available on the (FP10MDA Section of this site)

FP10P
FP10PN (Practice Nurse)
FP10CN (Community Nurse)
FP10SP (Supplementary prescriber)

Lilac

Forms used by nurse and pharmacist prescribers and supplementary prescribers. The form should be printed with information to identify the type of prescriber, for example, community practitioner nurse prescriber (formerly known as district nurse/health visitors), nurse independent prescriber or supplementary prescribers.

FP10D

Yellow

Forms issued by dentists in primary care. Only items listed in the dental formulary can be prescribed on this prescription.


Forms Originating in Wales

Prescription Form IdentifierColourNotes

WP10
WP10SS
WP10SP
WP10HP
WP10HSP

Green

Issued by GPs, hospitals and supplementary prescribers

WP10D

Green

Issued by dentists in primary care. Only items listed in the dental formulary can be prescribed on this prescription

WP10CN
WP10PN

Green

Forms issued by nurse prescribers

WP10MDA

Green

Instalment dispensing prescription form. More information is available on the (FP10MDA Section of this site)


Forms Originating from Scotland

Prescription
Form Identifier
ColourNotes

GP10
GP10SS

Orange

Issued by GPs

GP10(N)

Purple

Issued by nurse prescribers

GP14

Yellow

Issued by dentists

HBP

Blue

Issued in secondary care

HBP(A)

Pink

Instalment dispensing prescription for drug addicts


Forms Originating in Northern Ireland

Prescription
Form Identifier
ColourNotes

HS21
HS21CS

Green

Issued by GPs

HS21D

Yellow

Issued by dentists

HS21M

Grey

Issued by supplementary prescribers

HS21N

Purple

Issued by nurse prescribers

SP1

 Off-white

 Instalment dispensing form

SP2

Off-white with blue/pink watermark effect

 Instalment dispensing form


Forms Originating in the Isle of Man

Prescription
Form Identifier
ColourNotes

HS10

Pink

Issues by GPs, dentists and hospital prescribers

HS10MDA

Blue

Instalment dispensing form

HS10

Green (handwritten)

Pink (computer generated)

Issued by nursed prescribers

HS10 

Pink

Issued by dental prescribers

 HS10

Purple

Issued by pharmacy prescribers

 HS10SS

Pink

Issued by hospital prescribers


Pharmacy contractors will not be reimbursed by the NHS for dispensing the following prescription forms:

Prescription
Form Identifier
ColourIssued InNotes

FMed296

White

England

Issued to service personnel (army)

FP10P-Rec

Lilac

England

Used by out of hours centres

GP10A

White

Scotland

GP stock order form

GP10DTS

Pink

Scotland

Drug Testing Scheme

HS21S

White

Northern Ireland

GP stock order form

PS6

Yellow / White

Guernsey

Issued by primary care prescribers

H9

Yellow / White

Jersey

Issued by primary care prescribers


Private Prescribing

Prescription Form IdentifierColourIssued InNotes

FP10PCD-SS
FP10PCD-NC

Pink

England

Private prescription form issued for Schedule 2 & 3 Controlled Drugs (these prescriptions will not be passed for payment by the NHS Prescription Services). More information is available in the (Controlled Drug Guidance) section of this site.

WP10PCD
WP10PCDSS

Green

Wales

The form should be printed with information to indicate the type of private prescriber, for example, private doctor, nurse, pharmacist, optometrist, physiotherapist, radiographer or podiatrist.

PPCD(1)

Beige / Buff

Scotland

Copies of these forms should be sent to the NHSBSA each month for information purposes and not for reimbursement.

 

Bulk Prescriptions

A separate prescription form should be issued for each individual patient; the only exception to this is ‘bulk prescriptions’. Part VIII, Notes, Paragraph 9 of the Drug Tariff outlines the arrangements for bulk prescriptions. A bulk prescription is an order for two or more patients, bearing the name of a school or institution in which at least 20 persons normally reside, for the treatment of at least 10 of whom a particular doctor is responsible. Prescription only medicines can not be prescribed on bulk prescriptions and the only appliances that can be prescribed are prescribable dressings which do not contain POMs. No prescription charge is payable when a bulk prescription is dispensed. (also see FAQs below)


Bar Coded Prescriptions


During Release 1 of the Electronic Prescription Service in England, the paper FP10 prescription continues to act as the legal prescription and must always be signed by a prescriber. ETP enabled GP Systems are able to send prescription details electronically to the spine and print a barcode onto an ordinary FP10 prescription. The barcode links the FP10 to the unique prescription message held in the prescription database on the spine. An ETP enabled pharmacy, can then scan the barcode to download the electronic message, auto populating the pharmacy system with the patient’s prescription details.

During Release 1, prescriptions should be dispensed as now against the paper FP10 prescription and be submitted to the NHS Prescription Services for payment as normal. As payment for all prescriptions during Release 1 is based on the paper prescriptions submitted to the NHSBSA Prescription Pricing Division, there is no need to tick the ‘ETP Tokens for non-payment’ box on the FP34C Submission Form at this time.

During later releases of the service, there will also be occasions where prescriptions can be sent electronically to the NHS Prescription Services for reimbursement. Detailed guidance on this will be published at a later date.


FAQs

Q. There has been an outbreak of scabies within a family. Rather than issuing one prescription per family member, the prescriber has ordered sufficient quantity of ‘Permethrin 5% cream’ on one prescription to cover the whole family. Is this allowed?

A.  No. The bulk prescription is not meant to cover situations such as these.

The only exception to this rule is where the prescriber is responsible under their GMS contract for the treatment of 10 or more persons in a school or other institution in which at least 20 persons normally reside; and where the prescriber needs to prescribe for two or more of those persons for whose treatment the contractor is responsible. The prescription should bear the name of the school of institution concerned. More information about bulk prescriptions can be found in Part VIII Paragraph 8 of the Drug Tariff. A key point to note is that bulk prescriptions can only be issued for prescribable dressings and for medicines which are not classified as prescription only medicines.

Q. Is it legal for a GP to post date prescriptions, say for 3 or 6 months, for a patient to retain and get dispensed when required?

A. Yes. According to The Prescription Only Medicines (Human Use) Order 1997, a prescription must be endorsed with an appropriate date, defined as ‘...the date on which it was signed by the appropriate practitioner giving it or a date indicated by him as being the date before which it shall not be dispensed (15. (4) (a)).’

However, we suggest that the GP should seriously consider if a repeatable prescription will be more appropriate: repeatable prescriptions enable the pharmacist to make checks on whether the continued medication is appropriate for the patient, and are generally a preferred method than post-dating prescriptions.


More Information


Prescription Form Section of the NHS Prescription Services Website

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